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Immigration Statistics Q3 July/August/September 2017

Published by UK Home Office Thursday 30th November 2017

Asylum

Deportation/Detention

 

Asylum Q3 July/August/September 2017

Grants of Asylum/Protection Q3 July/August/September 2017

In the year ending September 2017, there were 15,618 grants of asylum, alternative forms of protection and resettlement, compared with 15,433 in the previous year. This comprised of:

  • 8,147 grants of asylum to main applicants and dependants (down 9%)
  • 1,123 grants of alternative form of protection to main applicants and their dependants (down 29%)
  • 6,348 people provided with protection and support under a resettlement scheme (up 30%)
The number of asylum applications in the UK from main applicants decreased by 21% to 26,617 in the year ending September 2017.

There were 2,765 asylum applications from Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children (UASC) in the year ending September 2017, a 15% decrease compared to the previous year of 3,244. The largest numbers of asylum applications from UASC were from Sudanese (which increased by around 5 times the number in the previous year) and Eritrean nationals, both accounting for 16% of applications each. This was followed by Afghan nationals (13%) and Albanian nationals (11%).

Of the 1,778 initial decisions relating to UASC made in the year ending September 2017, 56% were grants of asylum or another form of protection, and 24% of those were grants of temporary leave (UASC leave). UASC applicants that are refused will include those from countries where it is safe to return children to their families, as well as some applicants who were determined to be over 18 following an age assessment.

Of the 21,916 initial decisions on asylum applications from main applicants, 34% were grants of asylum or an alternative form of protection, compared to 35% in the previous year.

There were 924 grants of asylum, or an alternative form of protection, to Syrian nationals (including dependants) at initial decision in the year ending September 2017.

An additional 4,980 Syrian nationals were granted humanitarian protection under the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme (VPRS). Since this scheme began in 2014, a total of 9,394 people have been resettled.

Largest number of asylum applications in the year ending September 2017 came from Iranian nationals. This was followed by nationals from Pakistan and Iraq. Of the 5 nationalities with the highest number of applications, 4 saw falls compared with the previous year, and one (Sudan) saw an increase.

Applications from Syrian nationals saw a 68% fall in the year ending September 2017. This decrease should be seen alongside an increase in the number of Syrian nationals being granted protection in the UK through other means such as the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme. The number of Syrian’s granted protection through resettlement schemes increased by 20% in the most recent year (from 4,163 to 4,999).

Resettlement: In addition to those asylum seekers who apply in the UK, resettlement schemes are offered to those who have been referred to the Home Office by The United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR).

On 7 September 2015, an expansion to the existing Vulnerable Person Resettlement Programme (VPRS) was announced. Through this expansion, it was proposed that 20,000 Syrians in need of protection be resettled in the UK by 2020. A total of 9,394 people have been granted humanitarian protection under the VPRS since the scheme began, and in the year ending September 2017, 4,980 people were resettled under the VPRS across 229 different local authorities. Around half (51%) of those resettled under the VPRS were under 18 years old (2,525), and around half (47%) were female (2,356).

In the year ending September 2017, there were 1,368 people that have been resettled through other resettlement schemes including the Vulnerable Children Resettlement Scheme (412), Gateway Protection Programme (929) and the Mandate Scheme (27).

Support Provided to Asylum Seekers: At the end of September 2017, a total of 39,414 people in the UK were in receipt of support under Section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999. This number has increased by 4% since September 2016. The total figure remains considerably below that for the end of 2003 (the start of the published data series), when there were 80,123 people in receipt of Section 95 support.

Separately, at the end of September 2017, there were 3,923 people receiving support under Section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999, a 1% increase from the previous year.

Source: Home Office Immigration Statistics, http://bit.ly/2AprYzE



Deportation/Detention Q3 July/August/September 2017

Deportation/Detention Q3 July/August/September 2017

In the year ending September 2017, 27,565 people entered detention (of which 813 entered through prisons). This was a decrease of 7% compared with the previous year (29,758). From July 2017, the figure additionally includes a small number of individuals who entered immigration detention in prison and have not been transferred to the rest of the detention estate.
Over the same period, there was an 8% decrease in those leaving detention (from 30,210 to 27,809). From July 2017, the figure additionally includes a small number of individuals who left detention in prison who had not previously entered the rest of the detention estate.

As at the end of September 2017, excluding those in prison, there were 3,125 people in detention, a 4% increase on the number recorded at the end of September 2016 (2,998). Provisional data show a further 330 detainees were held in prisons.

The proportion of detainees being returned or voluntarily departing the UK on leaving detention increased from 46% in year ending September 2016 to 48% in the year ending September 2017.

The total number of enforced returns from the UK, including those not directly from detention, decreased by 1% to 12,560 in the year ending September 2017 compared with 12,707 in the previous year. This includes 10,397 enforced removals and 2,163 other returns from detention. In the same period, there were 20,691 voluntary returns (excluding returns from detention).

Of the 12,560 enforced returns in year ending September 2017, there were 2,373 enforced returns of people who had previously sought asylum, down 15% from the previous year (2,792).


In the year ending September 2017, provisional data show that 5,990 Foreign National Offenders (FNOs) were returned compared to 6,134 in the previous year. (see Returns table rt_06q (Returns volume 5)). This number reached a peak of 6,346 in the year ending March 2017.

This section provides an overview of emerging trends on individuals held in immigration detention (solely under Immigration Act powers) for a variety of reasons, including reasons within and outside the control of the Home Office. These figures show only those detained in immigration removal centres (IRCs), short-term holding facilities (STHF), pre-departure accommodation (PDA) and H M Prisons (from July 2017). Changes have now been made on the Home Office systems from mid-2017 onwards that have resulted in statistics on detention of immigration detainees in prisons now being fully incorporated into figures for detention of immigration detainees.

The majority of those recorded as entering immigration detention through prisons will subsequently be transferred to an IRC or STHF prior to removal. Previously these individuals would have been recorded as entering immigration detention in an IRC or STHF at the point of their transfer from prison. However, a small number of those entering immigration detention through prisons will not go on to enter the immigration detention estate (for example, because they are removed from the UK directly from prison and are not held at any point in the immigration detention estate). These individuals would not have previously been recorded in the figures.

Where an individual recorded as leaving immigration detention through prison had previously been detained in another part of the immigration detention estate, they would previously have been recorded as leaving that part of the detention estate. Those recorded as leaving immigration detention through prison, who had not been detained in another part of the estate, would not previously have been included in the figures.

Data on the number of individuals held in HM prisons under immigration powers at the end of the period are included in the detention tables for the first time. These data include time served foreign national offenders (FNOs), those formerly on remand, and those unsuitable to be held in the immigration detention estate. Previous releases have cited data for England and Wales only, provided by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS). As the NOMS data come from a different system to the Home Office data, the figures are not directly comparable. The data in this section should be considered provisional while the Home Office continue to make improvements to the process that captures the data. See the User Guide for more details.

In addition, figures in this section relate to returns of people, by the Home Office, who do not have any legal right to stay in the UK.

Source: Home Office Statistical Release, http://bit.ly/2w6UVf7




Home Office Charter Flights July/August/September 2017
                                                           
 Freedom of Information request –  46051

1. Number of males removed   376
2. Number of females removed   29
3. Number of escorts    830

4. Number of flights in total   11

5.  Destination Countries        

Albania 3 flights, 134 removed;

Germany 1 flight, 34 removed (third country nationals, not German nationals)

Pakistan 3 flights, 153 removed

Nigeria 2 flights, 57 removed

Ghana 2 flights, 27 removed (the Ghana flights went to Nigeria as well)

No children were removed on any of the flights

Source Freedom of Information request by ‘No-Deportations'


 


Last updated 30 November, 2017