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Immigration Statistics Q4 October/November/December 2016

Published by UK Home Office Thursday 23rd February2017

Asylum

Detention

Deportation

Of the 24,984 initial decisions on asylum applications from main applicants, 34% were grants of asylum or an alternative form of protection, compared to 40% in the previous year. A separate Home Office analysis shows that for the years 2012 to 2014, on average 36% of decisions were granted initially, but this proportion rose to 49% after appeal.

Grant rates vary considerably between nationalities. For example, at initial decision, the grant rate for Iranian nationals was 37% (1,455 grants), compared with 12% (286 grants) for Iraqi nationals. Overall, there were 8,466 grants at initial decision for all nationalities in 2016, which corresponds to the grant rate of 34%.

There were 1,591 grants of asylum or an alternative form of protection to Syrian main applicants at initial decision in 2016. The grant rate for Syrian applicants was 86%, but some of those not granted will have been transferred to have their case assessed by another EU member state, and other applicants may have been found not to be Syrian following investigation. An additional 4,369 Syrian nationals (including dependants) were granted humanitarian protection under the Syrian Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme (VPRS) 2016. Since this scheme began in 2014, a total of 5,706 people have been resettled.

Including dependants, the UK had the sixth highest number (39,000) of asylum applications within the EU in 2016. Germany (692,000), Italy (117,000) and France (83,000) were the 3 EU countries that received the highest number of asylum applications, together accounting for 75% of asylum applications in the EU in that period.

There were 6,224 applications for family reunion visas made outside of the UK in 2016; of these, the highest number came from Syrian nationals (2,005) seeking to join those with refugee status or humanitarian protection in the UK.

Including dependants, the total number of asylum applications to the EU in 2016 was an estimated 1,189,000, a decrease of 10% compared to 2015 (1,319,000).

Germany 692,000 – Italy 117,000 – France 83,000 – Austria 42,000 – Greece 39,000 – UK 39,000 – Other EU countries 176,000.

Currently Recorded Outcomes For 2015 Applications
The outcomes for the 32,733 main applicants who applied for asylum in 2015, as with previous cohorts, will be updated in subsequent annual reports. However, as at May 2016, it is estimated that 10,319 (32%) main applicants had been granted asylum, humanitarian protection (HP) or discretionary leave (DL), either at initial decision or after appeal; 9,168 (28%) were refused or withdrawn; and 13,246 (40%) were still under consideration and awaiting confirmation of an initial decision or appeal outcome.

Support Provided to Asylum Seekers
At the end of 2016, a total of 39,389 asylum seekers and their dependants were being supported in the UK under Section 95 (Immigration and Asylum Act 1999), compared with 34,363 at the end of 2015. The majority (36,626) were supported in dispersed accommodation, with 92% located outside of London. An additional 2,763 were receiving subsistence-only support, with half (50%) of these located in London. Although the total figure has risen since 2012, it remains considerably below that for the end of 2003 (the start of the published data series), when there were 80,123 asylum seekers in receipt of Section 95 support.

Applications Pending
At the end of 2016, 24,903 applications (received since April 2006) from main applicants were pending a decision (initial decision, appeal or further review), 6% less than at the end of 2015 (26,409). The number who had been awaiting an initial decision for more than 6 months increased by 143% (from 3,626 to 8,825) while those pending further review decreased by 59% to 3,428.

Asylum Appeals
HMCTS received 12,235 asylum appeals from main applicants in 2016, a 14% fall compared with the previous year (14,242).

Appeal determinations have increased from 9,224 in 2015 to 12,304 in 2016. These figures remain below the peaks in the number of appeals and the number of determinations in the year ending June 2010, which were 16,560 and 16,032 respectively. In 2016, the proportion of determined appeals that were dismissed was 54%, while 41% of appeals were allowed and 5% were withdrawn.

Age Disputes
Some asylum applicants claim to be children but there may be doubts as to whether this is in fact the case. In 2016, 918 asylum applicants had their age disputed and 908 age disputes resolved in the same period. Of those applicants whose age disputes were resolved in 2016, 67% were assessed to be over 18, despite claiming to be a child when initially applying for asylum.

Dependants
Including dependants, the number of asylum applications decreased by 4% from 39,968 in 2015 to 38,517 in 2016. This is an average of 1 dependant for every 4 main applicants. In the same period, 6,008 initial decisions were made relating to dependants; of these, 1,467 (24%) were grants of asylum or an alternative form of protection, and 4,541 (76%) were refusals.

 

Self-Harm in Immigration Detention Q4 2016

Q4 2016 Total Oct Nov Dec
Brook House 15 4 7 4
Campsfield House 4 1 2 1
Colnbrook 20 6 9 5
Dungavel 0 0 0 0
Harmondsworth 16 5 3 8
Morton Hall 26 6 18 2
The Verne 2 0 2 0
Tinsley House 0 Closesd
Yarl's Wood 2 2 0 0
Larne 1 0 0 1
Pennine House 0 0 0 0
Cedars 0 0 0 0
  24 41 21
Subtotal 86  

The number of people entering detention in 2016 decreased by 11% to 28,908 from 32,447 in the previous year.

Over the same period there was a 14% decrease in those people leaving detention (from 33,226 to 28,661). The proportion of detainees being returned or voluntarily departing the UK on leaving detention increased slightly from 45% in 2015 to 47% in 2016. Conversely, the proportion of detainees granted temporary admission or release (TA/TR) decreased slightly from 43% to 42%.
As at the end of December 2016, 2,738 people were in detention, 5% more than the number recorded at the end of December 2015 (2,607).

There were 86 attempted suicides and 606 Individuals on Formal Self-Harm at Risk.

People Leaving Detention by Nationality
In 2016, 28,661 people left detention. Indian nationals accounted for the highest number of people leaving (2,754), a decrease of 17% compared with 2015 (3,330).
Top 5 nationalities of people leaving detention, 2016
Nationality       Left detention - Returned - Granted *TA/TR leaving detention
India ----------------2,754 ------------31% ---------------------54%
Pakistan ------------2,545 ------------34% ---------------------51%
Albania -------------2,137 ------------80% ----------------------12%
Iran ------------------1,558 ------------6% -----------------------92%
Bangladesh ---------1,527 -----------27% ----------------------59%
*Temporary Admission or Temporary Release (TA/TR)

EU Nationals Leaving Detention

In 2016, 4,519 EU nationals left detention, 24% more than in 2015 (3,647). The largest number was Romanian nationals (1,521 or 5% of the total of all nationalities leaving detention). The second and third largest groups were Polish nationals (1,130 or 4%) and Lithuanian nationals (577 or 2%) respectively.
The proportion of EU nationals being returned or voluntarily departing the UK on leaving detention in 2016 was 89% (the same as 2015), compared with 39% for non-EU nationals.

Reasons For People Leaving Detention
After a steady decline from 64% in the year ending March 2011 to 44% in year ending June 2016, in the proportion of detainees being returned or voluntarily departing the UK on leaving detention the figure has climbed back to 47% in the year ending December 2016. Conversely, over the same period, the proportion of detainees granted TA/TR have increased from 28% to 45% and then declined to 42%. The proportion of detainees granted bail has increased from 6% to 10%.

Length Of Detention
During 2016, 28,661 people left detention. Of these, 64% had been in detention for less than 29 days, 18% for between 29 days and 2 months, and 11% for between 2 and 4 months. Of the 1,848 (6%) remaining, 179 had been in detention for between 1 and 2 years, and 29 for 2 years or longer.

In the same period, over a third (35%) of people leaving detention had been detained for 7 days or less (10,143). Of these, 54% (5,482) were returned; 43% (4,398) were granted TA/TR; and the remaining 3% were bailed (50), granted LTE or LTR (38), or released for other reasons (175). Of the 208 detained for 12 months or more, 38% were bailed, 29% were returned, and 29% were granted TA/TR.

As at 31 December 2016, the longest length of time a person had been currently detained for was 1,333 days (3 years six months).

Children in Detention
There were 71 children entering detention in 2016, 56% lower than the previous year (163). This was a 94% fall compared with the beginning of the data series in 2009 (1,119). Only 3 children entered detention in the last quarter of 2016 reflecting the closure of Cedars Pre-departure Accommodation (PDA) on 17 October 2016 and the temporary closure of Tinsley House Immigration Removal Centre (IRC) for refurbishment.

Of the 74 children leaving detention in 2016, 52 were granted TA/TR and 17 were returned from the UK. Of those leaving detention, 67 had been detained for 7 days or less, 3 for between 8 and 14 days, 1 for between 15 and 28 days and 3 for 29 days or longer. There were no children in detention as at 31 December 2016.

Immigration Detainees In Prisons
As at 09 January 2017, there were 484 detainees held in prison establishments in England and Wales solely under immigration powers as set out in the Immigration Act 1971 or UK Borders Act 2007.

Background Information
The figures in this topic brief relate to the number of people entering, leaving or in detention, solely under Immigration Act powers, at IRCs, STHFs and PDA). An individual may be held and remain in immigration detention for a variety of reasons, including reasons within and outside the control of the Home Office. Those outside the control of the Home Office may include but are not exclusively: individual compliance with immigration procedures, including providing appropriate paperwork; and barriers to removal relating to the individual’s personal circumstances or circumstances related to the intended country of return. Reasons within the control of the Home Office include: where the Home Office has assessed it is not in the public interest to release the individual pending return.

Hunger Strikes in Immigration Removal Centres Q4 2016

Q4 2016 Total Oct Nov Dec
Brook House        
Campsfield House        
Cedars        
Colnbrook        
Dungavel        
Harmondsworth        
Morton Hall        
The Verne        
Tinsley House        
Yarl's Wood        
Total Q@  

 

 

Enforced returns from the UK decreased by 11% to 12,193 in 2016 compared with 13,690 in 2015. This includes 10,706 enforced removals and 1,487 other returns from detention.

In 2016, there were 24,202 voluntary returns (excluding returns from detention) compared to 28,189 in the previous year.

The number of passengers refused entry at port and who subsequently departed has been mainly increasing since 2012, but fell by 1% in 2016 to 17,395 from 17,636 in 2015.

In 2016, provisional data show there were 5,705 returns of foreign national offenders (FNOs), using enforcement powers or via deportation. This is the one of the highest numbers since the series began in 2009 and reflects increasing use of other forms of FNO returns, including those where an offence was committed outside the UK.

Returns by Nationality
The highest number of enforced returns in 2016 was for Albanian nationals (1,626 or 13% of the total), of which 1,560 (96%) were returned home. The second highest number were Romanian nationals (1,589 or 13% of the total), of which 1,495 (94%) were also returned home; Romanian nationals have also shown the largest increase (503 or 46%) compared to 2015. Some of these returns may be due to specific enforcement activity related to specific groups of individuals from these countries.

The highest number of voluntary returns (excludes returns from detention) in 2016 was for Indian nationals (5,365 or 22% of the total), of which 4,793 (89%) were returned home. The second highest number were Pakistani nationals (2,801 or 12% of the total), of which 2,275 (81%) were also returned home.

The largest number of passengers refused entry at port and subsequently departed were United States (US) nationals (1,609 or 9% of the total), of which 1,007 (63%) were returned home. The second largest number was Brazilian nationals (1,210 or 7% of the total) who were also the nationality recording the largest increase compared with the previous year (333 or 38%). Of the 1,210 Brazilian nationals, 625 (52%) were returned home. US and Brazilian nationals, who are not coming to the UK for work or for 6 months or longer, do not need to apply for, and be issued with, a visa prior to arrival; therefore, the first time that they can be refused entry will be on arrival in the UK.

There were 22% more enforced returns (4,684) of EU nationals in 2016 compared with 2015 (3,848), and 21% more were refused entry at port and who subsequently departed (2,323 compared to 1,918).

Returns by ‘Harm’ Assessment
A harm matrix was introduced in 2007 to assess whether the Home Office was removing the most harmful people; ‘higher harm’ assessments include people who have committed serious criminal and immigration offences.

In 2016, 23% (2,464) of the 10,706 enforced removals were assessed as ‘highest harm’, compared with 19% (2,349) in the preceding year. In the same period, only 1% (175) out of the 25,689 voluntary removals (including returns from detention) were assessed as ‘highest harm’.

Foreign National Offenders
The Home Office also removes FNOs using enforcement powers or via deportation. In 2016, provisional data show that 5,705 FNOs were returned compared to 5,768 in 2015 (down 1%) and 5,286 in 2014 (up 8%). This is the one of the highest numbers since the series began in 2009 and reflects increasing use of other forms of FNO returns, including those where an offence was committed outside the UK.

Background Information
The figures in this section relate to numbers of people, including dependants, leaving the UK either voluntarily when they no longer had a right to stay in the UK or where the Home Office has sought to return them to their own country, an EU Member State, or a third country where they are permanently admissible. While individuals refused entry at port and who subsequently departed have not necessarily entered the country, their return requires action by the UK Border Force and Home Office, such as being placed on a flight, and is therefore included above.
As a result of feedback from users, Home Office statisticians have revised the existing terminology and category groupings and a number of new categories have been devised in August 2016, backdated to Q1 2014 (see table footnotes for further information). The underlying statistics collected have not been changed as a result of these clarifications.

Charter Flights Q4 October/November/December 2016

In all 364 persons were removed

 1. Number of males removed - 344 

2. Number of females removed - 20 

3. Number of escorts - 693 

4. Number of flights in total - 7 

Albania 4  Flights 215 Removed

Nigeria/Ghana 1 Flight 51 Removed

Pakistan   2 Flights 98 Removed

No children were removed on any of the flights


Number of individuals at Risk of Self-Harm Q4 2016

Q4 2016 Total Oct Nov Dec
Brook House 104 35 31 38
Campsfield House 23 8 8 7
Colnbrook 78 21 34 23
Dungavel 22 15 5 2
Harmondsworth 111 41 35 35
Morton Hall 94 35 30 29
The Verne 80 22 29 29
Tinsley House 0 Closed
Yarl's Wood 86 40 30 16
Larne 6 3 2 1
Pennine House 2 1 0 1
Cedars 0 0 Closed Closed
221 204 181
Subtotal 606  
Last updated 26 February, 2017